•  

    RESOURCES & MATERIALS

    RESOURCES & MATERIALS

  •  

    CONFERENCES WEBINARS & EVENTS

    CONFERENCES WEBINARS & EVENTS

Harmful Practices

Using gender-transformative approaches to prevent prenatal sex selection, child marriage, bride kidnapping and other forms of harmful practices.

Child marriage in Eastern Europe and Central Asia: Regional overview

Issue brief by UNFPA 

This report provides a brief overview of child marriage in the following countries and territories: Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kosovo (UNSCR 1244), the Kyrgyz Republic, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Serbia, Tajikistan, Turkey, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. It accompanies a set of fact sheets and executive summaries that provide more detailed information on the issue in each country. These country fact sheets are designed to provide a ‘snapshot’ of child marriage in this region, and are based on small-scale, rapid qualitative research carried out in two to three districts in each country or territory. Researchers carried out semi-structured interviews with girls and women (and some men) who married before the age of 18, as well as with national and local state officials, experts in women’s and children’s rights from the NGO sector, and professionals working in health and education. In some countries, focus groups were also held, in communities where child marriage is practiced. 

Read more ...

Preventing gender-biased sex selection in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

Issue brief by UNFPA, 2015. 

Gender-biased sex selection has emerged since the early 1990s as a widespread practice in parts of the Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) region and now constitutes a significant challenge to the countries affected. The preference of many parents for sons, combined with the use of modern technologies and declining fertility, has skewed the normal ratio between male and female births in several countries, mostly in the South Caucasus and parts of South-East Europe. As a result, an estimated 171,000 girls are already ‘missing’ in the region, and there has been a growing surplus of men.

Read more ...